Choosing a major can be a daunting task, but it doesn't have to be. It's important to remember one thing: choosing a major is NOT the same as choosing a career. You're not deciding "the rest of your life," but picking a college major. You're making one of the MANY decisions along the way to a meaningful career. 

Resources on How to Explore Majors and Careers:

What Can I Do with a Degree In...?
Explore what you can do with a certain major or degree. For example, what can you do with that history or English major?  Hint: there's a lot more than just teaching!

SIGI3 Career and Self-Assessment Tool
SIGI stands for System of Interactive Guidance and Information — this is a special tool that can help you plan your career! Among the features offered on SIGI3, you will find tools to help you research occupations; choose, change, or clarify a major; and evaluate your interests, skills, values, and personality! You can access SIGI3 by logging into Beaver Careers, or click the link. Login with your ONID username and password!

University Exploratory Studies Program (UESP)
Consider visitng OSU's University Exploratory Studies Program, which provides outstanding advising and resources for students in the process of deciding on a major. 

Career Decision-Making Class (ALS 114)
Consider taking ALS 114 - Career Decision-Making for a structured and engaging career exploration experience.

Career Consultations
Career Consultants are available to help you with any career-related questions. Whether you are interested in changing your major, wondering about jobs after college, or just interested in exploring your interests, our consultants are here to help!

Hands-on Learning and Exploration

The best way to learn and explore is by doing! Click here to check out a few ways to apply and develop your skills through job shadowing, internships, part-time jobs, and volunteering.

Informational Interviews

One of the best sources for gathering information about what's happening in an occupation or an industry is to talk to people working in the field. This process is called informational or research interviewing. An informational interview is an interview that you initiate - you ask the questions. The purpose is to obtain information, not to get a job, but it is extremely valuable in making connections and building your professional network!